LOADING
23
OCT
2019

Advancing Food Justice and Equity

Get tickets
A full-day gathering focused on taking action around issues of race and oppression in the food system and food movement. 9am to 7pm. Daniels Spectrum (585 Dundas St E) #FoodJusticeTO
Scroll

Advancing food justice and equity

In Toronto, racialized folks are three times more likely to be food insecure and twice as likely to grow up in poverty. This gathering is focused on issues of race and oppression in the  food system and food movement. Dialogue around racism in the food movement will enable food sector workers to share strategies to tackle these issues, including changes to HR policies, recruitment systems, hiring structures, internal training systems, shifts in funding approaches, and more.

This food justice focused gathering seeks to centre the voices of Black, Indigenous, and People of Colour (BIPOC) working in Toronto’s food system. We'll discuss how we can focus on and implement anti-oppression strategies in the food movement and food system. And we'll highlight and connect folks doing the work.

Please join us if you are involved in the food movement, work in the nonprofit sector, are an academic working on issues around food or work in the corporate sector (involved in CSR efforts and building anti-oppression strategies).

Dream Big: The Right to Food

It’s up to all of us to challenge “business as usual” in our food system. And we need to acknowledge the work that needs to be done within our own groups and organizations. We’re not exempt from this.

Paul M. Taylor
ED at FoodShare Toronto

Why food justice?

Food insecurity is complex. It’s more than geographic and economic barriers to food access. That’s why at FoodShare, food justice means working to dismantle systemic forms of oppression that exist in our food system and in our food movement.It means acknowledging that colonialism, capitalism, white supremacy, and patriarchy are some of the organizing principles embedded in our current food system, and work together to shape who gets a seat at the table, and who experiences the most food insecurity.For FoodShare, being a food justice organization means that we are aligning and evaluating our work to ensure that it drives at dismantling sites of exploitation within the food system and our food movement. We use an equity lens to seek justice, and food security, for everyone.

Get tickets

Sessions

No items found.
No items found.
120

folks from different sectors connecting and learning

8

insightful and catalyzing sessions

1

day of strategizing in service of food justice and equity

// 2019
Daniels Spectrum
585 Dundas St E
Toronto, ON
October
23
the folks advancing food justice

Speakers

VIEW PROFILE
Donald Corbiere

Donald is Odawa and works with the City of Toronto's Indigenous Affairs Office

VIEW PROFILE
Ann Hui

Ann Hui is The Globe and Mail's national food reporter, using food as a lens to explore public policy, health, the environment, and agriculture.

VIEW PROFILE
Suzanne Barr

Suzanne Barr is a chef, author and restauranteur.

VIEW PROFILE
Carolynne Crawley

Carolynne Crawley is a Mi'kmaw woman with African and Celtic ancestry and a forest therapy trainer and mentor.

VIEW PROFILE
Valerie Tarasuk

Valerie Tarasuk is a Professor in the Department of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Toronto, and the Principal Investigator on the PROOF research program.

VIEW PROFILE
Leticia Deawuo

Leticia is the Director at Black Creek Community Farm.

VIEW PROFILE
Sheliza Jamal

Sheliza Jamal is an educator, speaker and Equity and Inclusion Coach.

VIEW PROFILE
Leslie Campbell

Director of Programs at FoodShare.

VIEW PROFILE
Paul M. Taylor

Federal NDP Candidate for Parkdale—High Park & Executive Director of FoodShare Toronto.

VIEW PROFILE
Karen Washington

Karen Washington is a political activist and community organizer fighting for food justice.

Right to Food Sponsors

Generously supported by